Jen Tough Gallery

Lisa Pressman, 'Inward'

1,100.00
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Lisa Pressman, 'Inward'

1,100.00

Gorgeous bluer than blue oil on cradled panel by Lisa Pressman, known for her mark making and cold wax and oil works. Ready to hang in a new home.

"My work embodies a visual synthesis of stored memory. Personal recollections, both vivid and vague, build and decompose over time. Each painting, with its complex layered surface, elicits a visceral response, reshaping its own new history." —Lisa Pressman

When a collector recently asked Lisa Pressman how much time she had spent making a recent painting she answered directly: “About thirty years.” It’s an answer that likely came across as a bit flip at first, but considering the depth of experience that goes into her work, Pressman’s response was actually both forthright and graceful. To forge the searching, varied and surprising images that she makes, Pressman relies heavily on intuition: a faculty that has taken her many years to trust and talk about. “For many years I used to be embarrassed to talk about intuition,” she reflects, “but as time goes on I realize it is my strength."

Pressman is process-oriented and each image represents a kind of gradual accretion of ideas and methods that wouldn’t be possible without the broad foundation of caprices and ruminations that preceded it. Her work, which is abstract but still very much inspired by the process of seeing, has a sense of visual “rightness” that only intuition can validate. When she teaches, Pressman often tells her students to stare at something and then close their eyes as they draw it. Why? Because she feels that portraying the essence of things—filtered and re-constituted by the myriad subtleties of consciousness—is better than drawing from life. —John Seed, Interview in Huffington Post

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Gorgeous bluer than blue oil on cradled panel by Lisa Pressman, known for her mark making and cold wax and oil works. Ready to hang in a new home.

"My work embodies a visual synthesis of stored memory. Personal recollections, both vivid and vague, build and decompose over time. Each painting, with its complex layered surface, elicits a visceral response, reshaping its own new history." —Lisa Pressman

When a collector recently asked Lisa Pressman how much time she had spent making a recent painting she answered directly: “About thirty years.” It’s an answer that likely came across as a bit flip at first, but considering the depth of experience that goes into her work, Pressman’s response was actually both forthright and graceful. To forge the searching, varied and surprising images that she makes, Pressman relies heavily on intuition: a faculty that has taken her many years to trust and talk about. “For many years I used to be embarrassed to talk about intuition,” she reflects, “but as time goes on I realize it is my strength."

Pressman is process-oriented and each image represents a kind of gradual accretion of ideas and methods that wouldn’t be possible without the broad foundation of caprices and ruminations that preceded it. Her work, which is abstract but still very much inspired by the process of seeing, has a sense of visual “rightness” that only intuition can validate. When she teaches, Pressman often tells her students to stare at something and then close their eyes as they draw it. Why? Because she feels that portraying the essence of things—filtered and re-constituted by the myriad subtleties of consciousness—is better than drawing from life. —John Seed, Interview in Huffington Post